A Rose by Any Other Name – Neutrality of ICANN’s Top-level Domain Increase?

What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet. ~ William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

If names are not correct, language will not be in accordance with the truth of things.  ~ Confucius

Anyone who has ever selected his own domain name can appreciate the complexities involved.   Which domain name should I choose?  How will my selection best communicate my mission?  How will my choice distinguish my brand?  ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) has added a new factor to this decision making process, by expanding the options for domain names to the right of the dot.

PBS Newshour’s Ray Suarez recently moderated a discussion of the potential pluses and minuses as seen by opposing stakeholders ICANN and the Association of National Advertisers.  The upside being more domain names, greater access for Internet users worldwide, and increased branding potential.   Who wouldn’t want the dot-me option?  The downside being the loss of the status quo, the growth of domain names at a breakneck pace, and the increased potential for Internet misuse.  Should established brands pay a “$185,000 price tag” to safeguard their trademarks?

So, as William Shakespeare expressed it best, “What’s in a name?” portend ICANN’s changes as neutral?  Or as Confucius would suggest increasing top-level domains is tantamount to unbalancing the Internet, and thereby upsetting the apple cart.  Share your thoughts on where you stand and whether this change will affect you.

Vanaja R.

Newshour – Domain Names:  Debating the Effects of a Dot-Anything World 

 

Copyright © 2012 My Marketing Nirvana.  All rights reserved in all media.

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The “Grinch” Stole Showbiz’ Christmas – The Online Piracy Dilemma

Intellectual property has the shelf life of a banana.  ~ Bill Gates

Thieves respect property. They merely wish the property to become their property that they may more perfectly respect it.  ~ G.K. Chesterton

The recent release of the “Sherlock Holmes” sequel draws attention to a real life mystery:  How best to thwart online piracy?  A click of the mouse can lead to a bootleg copy which in turn impacts the movie’s bottom line.  Jeffrey Brown’s PBS Newshour interview showcases this dilemma and the opposing solutions being offered by giants of the entertainment and Internet industries, respectively, support of Congress’s SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) vs. a “follow the money” approach.

Although online piracy is a global occurence, the mystery here is not a whodunit but rather a what-to-do-about-it?  Is this the new reality – lack of intellectual property protections in the digital world?  Since the proverbial genie is out of the bottle, won’t diminished copyright protection have to be factored into today’s business models?

Just as the Grinch had no heart, online pirates profit by disregarding intellectual property rights.  In the end, they won’t prevail; Showbiz will still have its Christmas.  Share your thoughts on how we can protect intellectual property in the Internet Age.

Vanaja R.

Film, Music Industries Battle Leading Internet Companies Over Online Piracy

Copyright © 2011 My Marketing Nirvana.  All rights reserved in all media.

Best of Times, Worst of Times – Technology in the Digital Age

This is perhaps the most beautiful time in human history; it is really pregnant with all kinds of creative possibilities made possible by science and technology which now constitute the slave of man – if man is not enslaved by it. ~ Jonas Salk

A new technology sometimes creates more than it destroys. Sometimes, it destroys more than it creates. But it is never one-sided. ~ Neil Postman

Watching Margaret Warner’s recent interview of Mark Bowden, author of “Worm:  The First Digital World War,” on PBS’ Newshour got me thinking … have we as a society gained more than we have lost as a result of the digital age?  The book conversation illustrates the pitfalls of “the Wild West period of the Internet,” namely computer security issues – botnet, malware, and viruses.

As noted in my earlier post “The Power of Collaboration,” filmmaker Tiffany Shlain advances society has benefited from the Internet’s capablity to foster innovation and collective problem solving.  On the other hand, we’ve lost some of the niceties of the analog era, in-person interactions, deep thought, not being “on” 24-7, etc.

Can we have the best of both worlds – the digital and the analog?  Or as writer Neil Postman suggests, is there is a clear victor – society’s gained more, or lost more?  Share your thoughts on the positives and the negatives of technology in the digital age.

Mark Bowden’s Book Conversation on PBS Newshour

Vanaja R.

Copyright © 2011 My Marketing Nirvana.  All rights reserved in all media.